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My Little Garden Kiddie Kit

This is the perfect little kit you need to to teach a young child embroidery.

And, it comes with a video tutorial so kids can stitch along with the video and learn embroidery at a young age!

My Little Garden

This is a perfect embroidery kit for KIDS (recommended ages 7+). The embroidery kit includes every thing you need to create your own “My Little Garden” hoop art.

KID’S EMBROIDERY KIT Includes:

  • -Clear step-by-step instructions with lots of pictures and minimal words
  • VIDEO TUTORIAL so kids can learn and stitch along with guided video instructions
  • Linen fabric with PRE-TRACED pattern (pattern is traced with a Pilot Frixion Pen and can be erased with heat from an iron or blow dryer when your child is done
  • Cotton fabric to make the hoop more sturdy
  • Large embroidery needle (easy for kids to use, and not too sharp)
  • Thread
  • 4 inch embroidery hoop

use #threadunraveled when you share your creations 🙂

Here is the Stitch Along video tutorial:

Wild Daisies Embroidery Pattern

I have always loved daisies. When I was little, my mom, sisters, and I would frequently watch the movie “You’ve Got Mail” together. Because of that movie, I decided from a young age that daisies are my favorite flower. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, then you’re missing out and you need to watch “You’ve Got Mail” ASAP.

Because of my love for daisies, I created this Wild Daisies pattern. It was one of my very first patterns I ever made and I immediately fell in love with it. And apparently many of you have fallen in love with it too! This pattern is by far my most popular embroidery pattern.

Perfect for beginners and advanced embroiderers alike, this digital embroidery pattern takes you through everything you need to know to create this embroidery.

The Wild Daisies Embroidery Pattern includes:

PDF pattern (comes in black and white so it can be easily traced)
-pattern instructions (including what stitches to use, thread colors, and pictures to help you along the way)
-stitching guide (pictures and explanations for how to create the stitches needed for this pattern)
-video tutorials (links to videos that explain how to create specific stitches and back your hoop)

Note for BEGINNERS: If you are a true beginner to embroidery, your digital pattern also comes with a “Beginner’s Embroidery Guide” that will teach you all about your materials, how to transfer your pattern onto fabric and place the fabric in your hoop, how to thread your needle, and how to begin stitching your design. So yes, beginners can complete this design. 🙂

This pattern is sized for a 6-inch hoop, but you could enlarge or shrink it to fit any size hoop you wish. And please, feel free to use any color scheme you want with this pattern! Let your imagination carry you! 🙂

Fishbone Stitch

The fishbone stitch can be used in several ways, but it is usually used to embroider leaves.

I love the texture of this stitch. It makes leaves look realistic and dimensional.

Below is a video tutorial for embroidering the fishbone stitch!

I love to use the fishbone stitch in my embroidery patterns! Some of my favorite patterns that use this stitch are the Good Vibes Only and Squeeze The Day embroidery patterns.

French Knots

French Knots add so much texture to an embroidery piece. I love using them to fill in a little (or big) area of space or just to add a little flair to an embroidery piece. French knots are also great for simple things like dotting an i when you are stitching words.

Below is a video tutorial for creating french knots!

One of my favorite patterns that uses french knots is the Donut Worry Be Happy embroidery pattern. Not only does this pattern use French knots, but it’s also just cute and punny.

Satin Stitch

The satin stitch is used to fill in shapes. I love this stitch because it looks smooth and soft. I love how the thread all blends together and creates a silky texture.

I use the satin stitch in basically all of my embroidery patterns, it’s just THAT good!

Below is a video tutorial for creating the satin stitch!

These are some of my favorite patterns that use the satin stitch!

Home Is Where Your Mom Is
Wild Daisies
Good Vibes Only

Chain Stitch

The chain stitch is so fun! I love using this stitch to stitch lettering, outline shapes, and I even like to use it to fill in shapes!

I hadn’t ever thought of using this stitch to fill in shapes until I was working on the Christmas Ornaments Embroidery Pattern, but I ended up LOVING it!! Now I use it all the time.

Below is a tutorial for the chain stitch!

The Christmas Ornaments and the I’d Spend All Nine Lives With You are two fun embroidery patterns that will allow you to practice the chain stitch. Enjoy!

Back Stitch

The back stitch is one of the simplest embroidery stitches. It is used for outlining shapes, lettering, and creating solid lines.

This is the first stitch I ever learned. I used to embroider every pattern with just the back stitch. Needless to say, I have come a long way, but this is the perfect place to start!

Below is a video tutorial for creating the back stitch!

For practice with the back stitch, the Squeeze the Day embroidery pattern is a great place to start!

How to Frame Your Embroidery in a Picture Frame

Don’t get me wrong, I love framing my embroidery in the hoop it was created in. There is something special about the idea of framing it in the very thing you made it in… and it’s trendy 🙂 However, I have to say that sometimes framing your embroidery in an actual picture frame really gives it that special touch.

One of my favorite embroideries I like seeing in a picture frame is the “It Is Well With My Soul” pattern. I love how the frame perfectly fits around the daisies and words. If you love this pattern as much as me, it is also available as an embroidery kit.

Framing your embroidery in a frame may seem a bit tricky at first, but with just a few supplies, you will be able to do it in no time!

You will need:

  • picture frame
  • masking tape
  • scotch tape
  • scissors
  • pen/pencil (something to mark your fabric)

This video tutorial will teach you every step you need to follow to frame your embroidery in a picture frame. *The frame in this video tutorial is from Hobby Lobby.

How You Should Be Threading Your Needle

There are 3 reasons you should use this method for threading your needle!

  1. Your needle will NEVER come unthreaded!
  2. Your embroidery art will LOOK better!
  3. It is EASIER to pull through your fabric! Especially when you are using all 6 strands of the thread.

Lets start with the first reason! How many times have you been sewing with a needle and thread, and it comes unthreaded… again and again and again! This used to happen to me ALL THE TIME!!!! I got so frustrated with always having to re-thread my needle, but I finally got it down. Now I NEVER have to thread my needle because I accidentally pulled the needle too quickly and the thread came out. Here’s how!!

Let me start by explaining that a strand of thread is actually made up of 6 separate strands. So the strand can be separated into fewer strands if you want thinner lines for embroidery.

When I know I want to use all 6 strands of the thread for embroidery, I actually SPLIT MY THREAD so I have 3 strands and I thread my needle with those 3 strands. Then, I pull the needle down the thread half way and FOLD THE THREAD IN HALF, making 6 strands. I knot the thread at the bottom, tying all 6 strands together. Now I have a threaded needle and I KNOW my needle isn’t going to get unthreaded. Here is a video tutorial for how to do this.

The second reason this method is great is because it makes your embroidery work LOOK BETTER! I hate when I can see each individual strand of thread I’ve sewn, especially when I’m embroidering my favorite daisy pattern. By splitting my thread, it lays nicely on the fabric and blends together more easily because the strands have been separated. I am not as easily able to see each individual strand.

The third reason will SAVE you! Do your fingers ever hurt and ache after embroidering because you have had to work so hard to pull the thread through the fabric? I often like to use all 6 strands of thread in my embroidery, and if I thread my needle the “normal” way, this means I am pulling 12 strands of thread through the fabric (since its folded over). This KILLS my fingers. By threading your needle using my method, you won’t have to pull as many strands through the fabric for every single stitch.