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Chain Stitch

The chain stitch is so fun! I love using this stitch to stitch lettering, outline shapes, and I even like to use it to fill in shapes!

I hadn’t ever thought of using this stitch to fill in shapes until I was working on the Christmas Ornaments Embroidery Pattern, but I ended up LOVING it!! Now I use it all the time.

Below is a tutorial for the chain stitch!

The Christmas Ornaments and the I’d Spend All Nine Lives With You are two fun embroidery patterns that will allow you to practice the chain stitch. Enjoy!

Back Stitch

The back stitch is one of the simplest embroidery stitches. It is used for outlining shapes, lettering, and creating solid lines.

This is the first stitch I ever learned. I used to embroider every pattern with just the back stitch. Needless to say, I have come a long way, but this is the perfect place to start!

Below is a video tutorial for creating the back stitch!

For practice with the back stitch, the Squeeze the Day embroidery pattern is a great place to start!

How You Should Be Threading Your Needle

There are 3 reasons you should use this method for threading your needle!

  1. Your needle will NEVER come unthreaded!
  2. Your embroidery art will LOOK better!
  3. It is EASIER to pull through your fabric! Especially when you are using all 6 strands of the thread.

Lets start with the first reason! How many times have you been sewing with a needle and thread, and it comes unthreaded… again and again and again! This used to happen to me ALL THE TIME!!!! I got so frustrated with always having to re-thread my needle, but I finally got it down. Now I NEVER have to thread my needle because I accidentally pulled the needle too quickly and the thread came out. Here’s how!!

Let me start by explaining that a strand of thread is actually made up of 6 separate strands. So the strand can be separated into fewer strands if you want thinner lines for embroidery.

When I know I want to use all 6 strands of the thread for embroidery, I actually SPLIT MY THREAD so I have 3 strands and I thread my needle with those 3 strands. Then, I pull the needle down the thread half way and FOLD THE THREAD IN HALF, making 6 strands. I knot the thread at the bottom, tying all 6 strands together. Now I have a threaded needle and I KNOW my needle isn’t going to get unthreaded. Here is a video tutorial for how to do this.

The second reason this method is great is because it makes your embroidery work LOOK BETTER! I hate when I can see each individual strand of thread I’ve sewn, especially when I’m embroidering my favorite daisy pattern. By splitting my thread, it lays nicely on the fabric and blends together more easily because the strands have been separated. I am not as easily able to see each individual strand.

The third reason will SAVE you! Do your fingers ever hurt and ache after embroidering because you have had to work so hard to pull the thread through the fabric? I often like to use all 6 strands of thread in my embroidery, and if I thread my needle the “normal” way, this means I am pulling 12 strands of thread through the fabric (since its folded over). This KILLS my fingers. By threading your needle using my method, you won’t have to pull as many strands through the fabric for every single stitch.

7 SIMPLE EMBROIDERY STITCHES

There are so many embroidery stitches you can learn, but it’s important to start with the basics. Once you have a handle on these 7 simple embroidery stitches, you will be ready to embroidery almost any pattern!

This video tutorial will teach you how to embroider the following stitches!

Back Stitch

Split Stitch

Chain Stitch

Stem Stitch

French Knots

Satin Stitch

Lazy Daisy Stitch